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Frequently Asked Questions


Application Process

I am a sophomore at UW, can I still apply?

I am very interested in WISc but I don't think I will know by February if I want to attend UW-Madison. Can I still apply?

Is acceptance to the WISc program a binding commitment to attend UW-Madison?

I have above a 3.5 GPA but my SAT scores are below 1750. Am I still eligible to apply?

How and when will I know whether I’ve been accepted into the program?

 

Program Participation

Do I have to major in international studies or something similar to join the WISc program?

I have also been accepted to the Letters and Sciences Honors Program. Is it realistic to think I can participate in both of these programs given their time commitments?

The information provided discusses monthly ILC dinners and required first-year classes, but it also describes "other activities." Could you give me an idea of what these other activities would entail?

What if I can’t make it to an event because of a scheduling conflict?

Is each student guaranteed two study abroad grants or must they compete for them?

I have taken an AP Spanish class. Would the credits from this class be counted as part of the requirements?


Application Process


I am a sophomore, can I still apply?
No. WISc is an enrichment program that students apply to before arriving at UW, and participate in throughout their undergraduate career. At this time only prospective first year students are eligible to apply to the WISc program.

I am very interested in WISc but I don't think I will know by February if I want to attend UW-Madison. Can I still apply?
Yes. We understand that you may be considering many different schools as you complete your WISc application. You are encouraged to apply to the WISc program even if you are not completely sure will be attending UW in the fall. Out of courtesy to our review committee and to other applicants, however, we ask you let us know as soon as possible if at any point you do make a definitive decision to attend another school.

Is acceptance to the WISc program a binding commitment to attend UW-Madison?
No. Accepted students have until May 1 to accept or decline the invitation to join WISc. Out of courtesy to our review committee and to other applicants, however, we ask that if at any point you do make a definitive decision to attend another school that you let us know as soon as possible

I have above a 3.5 GPA but my SAT scores are below 1750. Am I still eligible to apply?
Yes. Students need to meet only ONE of the following criteria for minimum eligibility requirements:

-GPA of 3.5 or better on a 4.0 scale at the end of junior year
-Top 10% of graduating class
-Minimum ACT score of 30
-Minimum SAT composite score of 1800.

How and when will I know whether I’ve been accepted into the program?
Students will be contacted by email in late March or early April with acceptance decisions.

 

Participation

Do I have to major in international studies or something similar to join the WISc program?
No! WISc students pursue a variety of majors and disciplines from across campus. The 2010 graduating class included majors in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Psychology, Economics, Political Science, International Relations, Journalism, History, Legal Studies, and International Studies. Many of our students are studying public health, biology, chemistry, and other fields in the sciences as well. We expect WISc scholars to become leaders in their chosen fields and a global perspective is an essential element to this leadership.

I have also been accepted to the Letters and Sciences Honors Program. Is it realistic to think I can participate in both of these programs given their time commitments?
Yes. While we strongly encourage admitted students to carefully think through time commitments before joining the WISc program we have had several students who have successfully participated in both programs.

The information provided discusses monthly ILC dinners and required first-year classes, but it also describes "other activities". Could you give me an idea of what these other activities would entail?
Beyond the monthly dinners there will generally be two to three additional activities throughout the semester. For example, in 2013 students will have the opportunity to privately visit the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies' "Evolving Landscapes: 100 Years of Change in Western China" exhibit accompanied by the photographer Yin Kaipu. In 2012 we visited the Chazen Museum in October with an expert on Renaissance art and history for a private tour of art from the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. Past fall activities have also included participation in the Wisconsin Book Festival and specially scheduled talks and lectures. Each year in January (after winter break) we hold a half-day retreat for all WISc students and faculty advisors. In 2011 we invited local author and professor of anthropology Kirin Narayan to attend the event. Students read one of her books over break and then participated in a lively discussion of oral history traditions. In the spring semester it is common for students to attend the Wisconsin Film Festival with members of our faculty and to join in discussing the film they see over coffee afterwards. These are all considered "required" events but there are also other "optional" events and opportunities for students to choose from if they wish.

What if I can’t make it to an event because of a scheduling conflict?
Students participate in WISc throughout their entire undergraduate career so it is likely that occasional scheduling conflicts will be inevitable. Most WISc activities will take place on Tuesday late afternoons/early evenings and we ask students to avoid scheduling other commitments at that time. Of course, this is not always possible, so if students must miss events we ask that they contact us ahead of time to let us know they will absent. We try to be flexible as much as possible, but if students begin to miss the majority of WISc events or if there are chronic absences then there is a possibility of being placed on probation or asked to leave the program.

Is each student guaranteed two study abroad grants or must they compete for them?
Each student receives two study abroad grants provided they are in good standing with the program and have met the following program requirements:

- Regular attendance and participation in WISc events.
- Completion of IS212 (one-credit discussion section specifically for first-year WISc students) and ILS 209 (Introduction to Global Cultures) or equivalent as determined by the Steering Committee.
- Completion of four or more semesters of foreign language study.

Students receive a $1000 travel grant that may be applied toward a short-term program (typically used over winter or summer breaks) as well as a $2000 travel grant that may be applied toward a semester or year-long program.

I have taken an AP Spanish class. Would the credits from this class be counted as part of the requirements?
No. These courses would not be counted as filling the WISc foreign language requirements. WISc students commit to taking at least 4 semesters of additional foreign language courses while at UW-Madison. Many students use this as an opportunity to learn a new language or to develop deeper proficiency in a language they may have already begun. UW-Madison offers an outstanding array of foreign language opportunities and EXCELLENT foreign language departments! Learn more about UW’s many language offerings.